Do you feel lost trying to understand the often complex Indian political landscape? Or are you a political enthusiast interested in comprehensively understanding India’s politics and key election terminology, terms, and concepts?

If yes, then this blog is definitely for you! In this post, we will explore an A-Z glossary of all the essential Indian election terminology that one must know to be well-informed about what’s happening in Indian Politics.

Whether it is understanding different parties and institutions or comprehending how voting works in India – this blog aims to decode each element for better comprehension. Whether you are new or experienced with Election life in India, let’s break down every concept surrounding it as simply as possible!

Do you find yourself overwhelmed when searching for detailed information on Indian politics? Make sure the political terminology makes understanding India’s election process challenging. Please deeply dive into Indian politics with our comprehensive guide:

The Indian Election Glossary. From Abhay Yojana to Yuva Swabhiman Yojana, this glossary outlines all topics relevant to contemporary Indian Politics and includes definitions, terms, and concepts as an easy reference for your use. With meaningful insights from experts in the field of politics, allow us to provide insight through a master list of essential details that will help make this electoral season easier for interpretation.

Indian Election Glossary: A to Z Indian Politics Terminology, Terms, and Concepts

All India Anna Dravida Munnetra Kazhagam (AIADMK): A political party in Tamil Nadu, founded in 1972.

All India Trinamool Congress (AITC): A political party in West Bengal, founded in 1998.

Anti-Defection Law: A law that prohibits members of parliament or state legislatures from defecting to another political party without losing their seat.

Alliance: A formal or informal agreement between two or more political parties to cooperate in an election or on specific issues.

Association of Democratic Reforms (ADR): A non-governmental organization that promotes electoral and political reform in India.

Alliance for Justice and Democracy: A coalition of political parties and organizations in India that advocate for secularism, human rights, and democracy.

All India United Democratic Front (AIUDF): A political party in Assam, founded in 2005.

All India Forward Bloc (AIFB): A political party in India, founded in 1939 as a breakaway group from the Communist Party of India.

All India Muslim League: A political party in India that was founded in 1906 and played a crucial role in the creation of Pakistan.

All India Sikh Students Federation (AISSF): A Sikh political organization in India that advocates for the rights of Sikhs and campaigns for the creation of a separate Sikh state.

Anti-Brahminism: The belief that the Brahmins, the highest Hindu caste, have unfairly dominated Indian society and politics and should be opposed or eliminated.

Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP): A political party in India, founded in 1980, that advocates for Hindu nationalism and conservative policies.

Bahujan Samaj Party (BSP): A political party in India, founded in 1984, that represents the interests of the Bahujan (Dalit, OBC, and other marginalized communities).

Bharatiya Kisan Union (BKU): A farmers’ organization in India that advocates for the rights and interests of farmers.

Backward Classes: A term used in India to refer to social groups that are socially and economically disadvantaged but not considered part of the Scheduled Castes or Scheduled Tribes.

Bicameralism: A system of government in which the legislature is divided into two houses or chambers, typically the lower house (Lok Sabha) and the upper house (Rajya Sabha).

Bharatiya Mazdoor Sangh (BMS): A trade union in India that represents the interests of workers in various industries.

Biju Janata Dal (BJD): A political party in Odisha founded in 1997.

Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan: A cultural and educational organization in India, founded in 1938, that promotes Indian culture and values.

Bhim Army: A Dalit rights organization in India, founded in 2015, that advocates for the rights and interests of the Dalit community.

Communist Party of India (CPI): A political party in India, founded in 1925, that advocates for communism and socialism.

Congress Party: A political party in India founded in 1885, it has been the dominant force in Indian politics since independence.

Coalition: A group of political parties together to form a government.

Communist Party of India (Marxist) (CPI(M)): A political party in India, founded in 1964, that advocates for communism and socialism.

Chief Minister: The head of government in India’s state or union territory.

Communalism: The promotion of the interests of a particular religious or ethnic community, often at the expense of other communities.

Coalition Dharma: A term used to describe the unwritten rules and norms governing a coalition government’s functioning in India.

Confederation: A loose association of independent states or organizations that agree to cooperate on specific issues or objectives.

Casteless Society: A term used to describe a society in which the traditional Hindu caste system has been abolished, and all individuals are treated as equals.
Constituency: A geographical area that elects a representative to Parliament or a state legislature.

Communist Party of India (CPI): A political party in India, founded in 1925, that advocates for communism and socialism.

Dravida Munnetra Kazhagam (DMK): A political party in Tamil Nadu, founded in 1949.

Dravidian: A term used to describe the culture and language of the people of South India, especially the states of Tamil Nadu, Kerala, and Karnataka.

Democracy: A system of government in which the people can choose their leaders through free and fair elections.

Direct Action Day: A day of violent protests and riots in Calcutta (now Kolkata) in 1946, organized by the Muslim League to demand the creation of a separate Muslim state.

District: A geographical area divided into constituencies to elect representatives to Parliament or a state legislature.

Democratic Socialism: A political ideology that combines the principles of democracy with those of socialism, emphasizing social justice and economic equality.

Democratic Alliance: A coalition of political parties in India that supports the principles of democracy and secularism.

Demographics: The statistical characteristics of a population, such as age, gender, race, and income.

Electoral College: A body of electors responsible for electing the President and Vice President of India.

Election Commission of India: A constitutional body responsible for conducting and supervising elections in India.

Election Manifesto: A document that outlines the policies and promises of a political party or candidate in an election.

Election Symbol: A graphical or visual representation assigned to a political party or candidate by the Election Commission of India.

Election Day: The day on which voting takes place in an election.

Electioneering: The activities and efforts of political parties and candidates to persuade voters to support them in an election.

Electoral Roll: The list of eligible voters in a constituency, compiled and maintained by the Election Commission of India.

Electronic Voting Machine (EVM): A voting machine that uses electronic technology to record and count votes.

Electoral Reforms: Changes to the laws, rules, and procedures governing elections in India to improve their fairness, transparency, and efficiency.

First Past the Post: A system of voting in which the candidate who receives the majority votes in a constituency is declared the winner, regardless of whether they have received a majority of the votes.

Frontal Organization: A political or social organization affiliated with a political party or ideology but operates independently and may have a different name or purpose.

Federalism: A system of government in which power is divided between a central government and regional or state governments.

Fundamental Rights: The basic rights and freedoms guaranteed to all citizens of India by the Constitution, such as freedom of speech, religion, and assembly.

Forward Castes: The Hindu castes are considered higher than the Backward Classes but lower than the Brahmins.

Fraud: The intentional deception or misrepresentation of facts to gain an unfair advantage in an election.

Federal Front: A hypothetical coalition of regional political parties in India that would seek to challenge the dominance of the Congress Party and the Bharatiya Janata Party.

Foreign Policy: The policies and actions of a country in its relations with other countries.

Frontal Organization: A political or social organization affiliated with a political party or ideology but operates independently and may have a different name or purpose.

Gandhi: A term used to refer to India’s political and spiritual leaders, especially Mahatma Gandhi, who played a vital role in the Indian independence movement and the development of modern Indian politics.

Gandhi-Irwin Pact: An agreement signed in 1931 between the British government and Mahatma Gandhi, in which Gandhi agreed to end the civil disobedience movement in exchange for certain concessions from the British.

Gandhi-Ambedkar Pact: An agreement signed in 1932 between Mahatma Gandhi and B. R. Ambedkar, in which Gandhi agreed to support the demand for separate electorates for the Dalits in exchange for the Dalits’ support for the Congress Party.

Gandhi Cap: A white cotton cap with a wide band, traditionally worn by the supporters of the Congress Party and the Gandhi family.

Gandhi Peace Prize: An annual award given by the Government of India to individuals or organizations contributing to international peace and non-violent social change.

Gandhi National Open University (IGNOU): A distance learning university in India, established in 1985, that offers a range of academic and professional courses.

Gandhi Jayanti: The birthday of Mahatma Gandhi, celebrated on October 2 as a national holiday in the nation.

Indira Gandhi: The daughter of Jawaharlal Nehru and the Prime Minister of India from 1966 to 1977, 1980 to 1984.

Gandhi, Rajiv: The son of Indira Gandhi and the Prime Minister of India from 1984 to 1989.

Gandhi, Sanjay: The younger son of Indira Gandhi and a prominent politician in the Congress Party.

Hinduism: The dominant religion in India, which is based on the belief in a supreme being and the cycle of birth, death, and rebirth.

Hindutva: A political ideology that seeks to establish India as a Hindu nation and promote Hindu values and culture.

Hindu Nationalism: The belief that India should be a Hindu nation and that Hindus should have a privileged position in society.

Hindu Rashtra: A term used by Hindu nationalists to refer to a Hindu nation or state.

Hindu-Muslim Riots: Violence between Hindus and Muslims, often sparked by religious or political tensions.

Hindu Mahasabha: A political organization in India that advocates for Hindu nationalism and establishing a Hindu state.

Hindu Unity: A term used by Hindu nationalist organizations to describe their goal of uniting Hindus across India, regardless of caste, class, or regional differences.

Hindu-Sikh Relations: The relationship between Hindus and Sikhs in India has often been marked by conflict and tension.

Hindu-Christian Relations: The relationship between Hindus and Christians in India has sometimes been strained by religious and cultural differences.

Hindu-Buddhist Relations: The relationship between Hindus and Buddhists in India has sometimes been marked by conflict and competition.

India: A country in South Asia surrounded by Pakistan, China, Nepal, Bhutan, Bangladesh, and Myanmar.

Independence Day: A national holiday in India, celebrated on August 15, marks the country’s independence from British rule in 1947.

Indian National Congress (INC): A political party in India founded in 1885, it has been the dominant force in Indian politics since independence.

Indian Constitution: The supreme law of India was adopted on November 26, 1949, and came into force on January 26, 1950.

Indian National Army (INA): An armed force composed of Indian prisoners of war and expatriates, formed during World War II to fight for Indian independence from British rule.

Indian Independence Movement: The political and social movement in India that sought to end British rule and establish an independent Indian state.

Indian Foreign Policy: The policies and actions of the Government of India in its relations with other countries.

Indian National Security: The measures and strategies adopted by the Government of India to protect the country’s territorial integrity, sovereignty, and national interests.

Indian Army: The land-based branch of the Indian Armed Forces, responsible for defending India’s borders and promoting national security.

Indian Parliament: The supreme legislative body of India, composed of the President, the Rajya Sabha (Council of States), and the Lok Sabha (House of the People).

Janata Party: A political party in India, founded in 1977, was a coalition of various parties and organizations that opposed the Congress Party.

Janata Dal (United): A political party in India, founded in 1999, that is a regional party in Bihar.

Janata Dal (Secular): A political party in India, founded in 1999, is a regional party in Karnataka.

Janata Dal (S): A political party in India, founded in 1988, is a regional party in the state of Kerala.

Janata Dal (Socialist): A political party in India, founded in 1980, is a regional party in Bihar.

Jawaharlal Nehru: The first Prime Minister of India served from 1947 to 1964.

Jan Sangh: A political party in India, founded in 1951, that was the precursor of the Bharatiya Janata Party.

Jammu and Kashmir: A state in India, situated in the northernmost part of the country, with a majority Muslim population.

Jana Sangh: A political party in India, founded in 1951, that was the precursor of the Bharatiya Janata Party.

Jharkhand: A state in eastern India, formed in 2000, with a predominantly tribal population.

Kargil War: A military conflict between India and Pakistan occurred in the Kargil district of Jammu and Kashmir in 1999.

Kashmir: A region in the northernmost part of India, disputed between India and Pakistan.

Khalistan Movement: A political movement that seeks to establish a separate Sikh state in the Punjab region of India.

Khap Panchayat: A traditional council of elders in India, typically composed of men from the same village or community, who make decisions on social and political issues.

Kisan Sabha: A farmers’ organization in India that advocates for the rights and interests of farmers.

Kerala: A state in southern India known for its high literacy rate and progressive social policies.

Khalistani Terrorism: Terrorism carried out by individuals or groups supporting the Khalistan Movement.

Kisan Long March: A protest march by farmers in Maharashtra in 2018, demanding higher prices for their produce and loan waivers.

Kerala Model: A term used to describe Kerala’s social and economic policies, which are seen as a model for other states to follow.

Kisan Union: A farmers’ organization in India that advocates for the rights and interests of farmers.

Left Front: A coalition of left-wing political parties in India, formed in 1964 to challenge the dominance of the Congress Party.

Left Wing: A political ideology that emphasizes the importance of equality, social justice, and the welfare state.

Lok Sabha: The lower house of the Indian Parliament, composed of elected members from India’s states and union territories.

Lokpal: An independent body investigating corruption allegations against public officials in India.

Lok Sabha Speaker: The presiding officer of the Lok Sabha, who is responsible for conducting the business of the house and ensuring that the rules of procedure are followed.

Lok Adalat: A court or forum in India that resolves disputes through mediation and conciliation rather than traditional legal procedures.

Left Front: A coalition of left-wing political parties in India, formed in 1964 to challenge the dominance of the Congress Party.

Left-Wing Extremism: The use of violence and terrorism by left-wing groups to advance their political agenda.

Land Acquisition Act: A law in India that allows the government to acquire land from private individuals or organizations for public purposes, such as constructing roads or buildings.

Land Reforms: Changes to the laws and policies governing the ownership and use of land in India to promote social and economic justice.

Mahatma Gandhi: The pre-eminent leader of the Indian independence movement, known for his philosophy of non-violence and his role in the Indian National Congress.

Mayawati: A political leader in India, the former Chief Minister of Uttar Pradesh, and the Bahujan Samaj Party (BSP) leader.

Muslim League: A political party in India, founded in 1906, that sought to protect the rights and interests of Muslims in India.

Muslim Personal Law: The body of laws that govern personal matters such as marriage, divorce, and inheritance for Muslims in India.

Mandal Commission: A commission appointed by the Government of India in 1979 to investigate the social, economic, and educational status of the Other Backward Classes (OBCs) in India.

Municipal Corporation: The governing body of a city or municipality in India, responsible for providing public services and managing the city’s affairs.

Minority Rights: The rights of individuals or groups who are in the minority in a particular society to protect them from discrimination and promote their social and economic well-being.

Madras High Court: The high court of the state of Tamil Nadu, which has jurisdiction over the state and its capital, Chennai.

Madrasas: Islamic schools in India where students study the Quran and other religious texts.

Mandal Commission: A commission appointed by the Government of India in 1979 to investigate the social, economic, and educational status of the Other Backward Classes (OBCs) in India.

Nationalism: The belief in the importance of national identity, culture, and unity and the desire to protect and promote these things.

National Security: A country’s measures and strategies to protect its territorial integrity, sovereignty, and national interests.

National Congress: A term used to refer to the Indian National Congress, a political party in India that has been the dominant force in Indian politics since independence.

National Front: A coalition of political parties in India formed in 1989 to challenge the dominance of the Congress Party.

National Democratic Alliance (NDA): A coalition of political parties in India formed in 1998 to challenge the dominance of the Congress Party.

National Democratic Party (NDP): A political party in India, founded in 1994, is a regional party in Maharashtra.

National Election Commission: A term used to refer to the Election Commission of India, the constitutional body responsible for conducting and supervising elections in India.

National Security Advisor: The chief advisor to the Prime Minister of India on national security and foreign policy matters.

National Rural Employment Guarantee Act (NREGA): A law in India that guarantees employment to rural households to reduce poverty and promote rural development.

National Green Tribunal (NGT): A special court in India that deals with environmental issues and disputes related to environmental laws and regulations.

Opinion Polls: Public opinion surveys are conducted by research organizations or media outlets to gauge the level of support for political parties, candidates, or issues.

Other Backward Classes (OBCs): A category of socially and economically disadvantaged groups in India, as identified by the Government of India for affirmative action.

One Nation, One Poll: A proposal to hold simultaneous elections to the Lok Sabha and state assemblies in India to save time and resources.

Opposition Parties: Political parties that are not in power and oppose the ruling party’s policies and actions.

Overseas Indians: Indian citizens living outside India may retain the right to vote in Indian elections.

Overseas Voting: The process by which Indian citizens who live outside India can exercise their right to vote in Indian elections.

One Nation, One Tax: A term used to describe the implementation of Goods and Services Tax (GST) in India, which replaced multiple indirect taxes with a single, uniform tax.

One Nation, One Language: A proposal to make Hindi the national language of India and promote its use in g, replacing education.

One Nation, One Card: A proposal to introduce a single, national identity card for all Indian citizens to access government services and benefits.

One Nation, One Ration Card: A proposal to introduce a single national ration card for all Indian citizens to access subsidized food from the Public Distribution System (PDS).

Political Parties: Organizations that seek to influence government policies and decisions through the electoral process.

Parliament: The supreme legislative body of a country, composed of elected representatives from the states or provinces of the country.

Political Campaign: The organized effort by a political party or candidate to win an election.

Prime Minister: The head of government of a country, appointed by the President or elected by the Parliament.

Political Manifesto: A document that outlines a political party’s policies, principles, and priorities.

Political Rally: A public meeting or gathering organized by a political party or candidate to promote their campaign and gain support.

Political Advertising: The use of paid advertising, such as television or radio ads, posters, or social media posts, to promote a political party or candidate.

Polling Booth: A designated location where voters can vote in an election.

Polling Day: The day an election is held, voters go to the polling booth to cast their ballots.

Polling Station: A designated location where voters can vote in an election.

Quota System: A system of affirmative action in India whereby a certain percentage of government jobs and educational institutions are reserved for certain disadvantaged groups like Scheduled Castes (SCs), Scheduled Tribes (STs), and Other Backward Classes (OBCs).

Queen’s Baton: A baton carried by a relay of runners from one Commonwealth country to another as part of the Commonwealth Games.
Quit India Movement: A political movement launched by Mahatma Gandhi in 1942, calling for immediate British withdrawal from India.

Quick Count: The process of tallying and tabulating the results of an election as soon as the votes are counted to provide a preliminary result.

Quota System: A system of affirmative action in India whereby a certain percentage of government jobs and educational institutions are reserved for certain disadvantaged groups like Scheduled Castes (SCs), Scheduled Tribes (STs), and Other Backward Classes (OBCs).

Queue Management: The process of organizing and managing the lines of voters at polling booths to ensure that the voting process is smooth and orderly.

Quick Response (QR) Code: A two-dimensional barcode that can scan by a smartphone or other device to provide information or access to a website or other online content.

Quiet Period: The period before an election when campaigning is suspended, and no political advertisements are allowed to be broadcast.
Quota Reform: Changes to the quota system aimed at making it more effective, equitable, and transparent.

Quorum: The minimum number of members required to be present at a meeting or session of a legislative body to conduct official business.

Rashtriya Janata Dal (RJD): A political party in India, founded in 1997, is a regional party in Bihar.

Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS): A right-wing, Hindu nationalist organization in India, founded in 1925, affiliated with the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP).

Right Wing: A political ideology that emphasizes the importance of individual freedom, capitalism, and limited government intervention in the economy.

Rajya Sabha: The upper house of the Indian Parliament, composed of elected and nominated members from India’s states and union territories.

Right-Wing Extremism: The use of violence and terrorism by right-wing groups to advance their political agenda.

Right to Information (RTI) Act: A law in India that gives citizens the right to access government information to promote transparency and accountability.

Ruling Party: The political party or coalition of parties in power, either at the national level or in a particular state or region.

Rajya Sabha: The upper house of the Indian Parliament, composed of elected and nominated members from India’s states and union territories.

Rural Development: The process of improving rural areas’ social and economic conditions through implementing government programs and policies.

Rural Electrification: Providing electricity to rural areas to improve access to essential services and promote development.

Secularism: The principle of separation of religion and state and the equal treatment of all religious groups in a country.

Social Media: Websites and online platforms that allow users to create and share content, such as text, images, and videos, with a large audience.

Socialist: A political ideology that emphasizes the importance of equality, social justice, and the welfare state.

State Governments: The governments of India’s states and union territories are responsible for the administration and governance of their respective forms.

Swachh Bharat Abhiyan: A government campaign in India launched in 2014 to promote cleanliness and hygiene in public places.
State Assembly Elections: Elections to the legislative assembly of a state or union territory in India.

State Election Commission: The constitutional body responsible for conducting and supervising elections in India’s particular state or union territory.

Supreme Court: The highest court of appeal in India, with the power to interpret the Constitution and settle issues between the various organs of the state.

Tamil Nadu: A state in southern India known for its ancient temples and cultural heritage.

Telangana: A state in southern India, formed in 2014 from the northern regions of Andhra Pradesh.

Telugu Desam Party (TDP): A political party in India, founded in 1982, is a regional party in Andhra Pradesh.

Telangana Rashtra Samithi (TRS): A political party in India, founded in 2001, is a regional party in Telangana.

Tamil Nadu Chief Minister: The head of the government of the state of Tamil Nadu, appointed by the Governor, is responsible for the administration of the state.

Telangana Chief Minister: The head of the government of the state of Telangana, appointed by the Governor, is responsible for the administration of the state.

Telugu: The official language of Andhra Pradesh and Telangana and one of the major languages of India.

Tamil Nadu: A state in southern India known for its ancient temples and cultural heritage.

Union Territory: A type of administrative division in India directly governed by the federal government, without a state government.

United Progressive Alliance (UPA): A coalition of political parties in India formed in 2004 to challenge the dominance of the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP).

Uttar Pradesh: A state in northern India with a population of over 200 million, making it the most populous state in the country.

Union Budget: The annual financial statement presented by the Government of India, outlining its revenue and expenditure for the upcoming fiscal year.

Union Minister: A member of the federal government of India, selected by the President at the suggestion of the Prime Minister and responsible for a particular portfolio or department.

Upper House: A term used to refer to the Rajya Sabha, the upper house of the Indian Parliament, composed of elected and nominated members from India’s states and union territories.

United Nations (UN): An international organization founded in 1945 that promotes international cooperation and the peaceful resolution of conflicts.

United Nations Development Programme (UNDP): A UN agency that assists developing countries in economic and social development.

United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO): A UN agency that promotes international cooperation in education, science, and culture.

United Nations Human Rights Council (UNHRC): A UN body that promotes and protects human rights worldwide and addresses human rights violations.

Voter Turnout: The percentage of voters who can cast their ballots in an election.

Voter Verification and Information System (VVIS): A system used in India to verify the identity of voters and prevent fraud and electoral malpractices.

Voter ID Card: A government-issued identification card issued to Indian citizens eligible to vote in elections.

Voter Education: The process of educating voters about their rights and responsibilities, the electoral process, and the issues and candidates in an election.

Voting Machine: An electronic device used to cast and count votes in an election.

Voter List: A list of all eligible voters in a particular electoral constituency, determining who is allowed to vote in an election.

Voter Registration: Enrolling eligible voters on the voter list allows them to participate in elections.

Voter Turnout: The percentage of voters who can cast their ballots in an election.

Voting Day: The day an election is held, voters go to the polling booth to cast their ballots.

Voter Verification and Information System (VVIS): A system used in India to verify the identity of voters and prevent fraud and electoral malpractices.

West Bengal: A state in eastern India known for its cultural diversity and rich history.

Women’s Reservation Bill: A bill that proposes to reserve 33% of seats in the Lok Sabha and state assemblies for women.

West Bengal Chief Minister: The head of the government of the state of West Bengal, who is appointed by the Governor and is responsible for the administration of the state.

West Bengal Assembly Elections: Elections to the legislative assembly of the state of West Bengal.

West Bengal Election Commission: The constitutional body responsible for conducting and supervising elections in West Bengal.

Women’s Empowerment: The process of enabling women to exercise their rights and access opportunities to achieve equality and improve their social and economic status.

Women’s Participation: The involvement of women in political, social, and economic activities and their contribution to decision-making and leadership.

Women’s Rights: The rights and entitlements guaranteed to women under the Constitution and other laws necessary for their dignity and equality.

Women’s Vote: The right of women to participate in the electoral process and to have their voices heard and their interests represented.

Women’s Reservation Bill: A bill that proposes to reserve 33% of seats in the Lok Sabha and state assemblies for women.

External Affairs Minister: The member of the federal government of India responsible for the country’s relations with foreign governments and international organizations.

eXpats: Short for “expatriates,” individuals who live and work outside their country of citizenship.

I am expressing Opinion: The act of stating one’s views, beliefs, or opinions on a particular issue or topic.

We are expanding the Voter Base: The process of increasing the number of eligible voters, either by registering more voters or lowering the minimum voting age.

Expanding Political Participation: The process of encouraging more people, especially marginalized or underrepresented groups, to engage in the political process.

Extending Voting Hours: The decision to open polling hours on voting day to allow more people to cast their ballots.

Extending Polling Booths: Increasing the number of polling booths in a particular area to reduce wait times and improve access to voting.

Extending Campaigning Period: The decision to extend the period allowed for campaigning in an election to provide more opportunities for candidates to reach voters.

They are expanding Voter Education: The process of increasing the availability and accessibility of information and resources for voters to improve their understanding of the electoral process.

Youth Vote: The participation of young people (aged 18-29) in the electoral process and the issues and candidates that concern them.

Youth Engagement: The involvement of young people in political, social, and economic activities and their contribution to decision-making and leadership.

Youth Participation: The active involvement of young people in the political process, including voting, campaigning, and volunteering.

Youthful Candidates: Candidates who are young and have little or no political experience but are seeking to challenge the established political elites.

Youthful Parties: Political parties that are led by young people or that prioritize the interests and concerns of young people.

Youthful Politics: A political movement or ideology that emphasizes the importance of the youth and seeks to empower and engage young people in the political process.

Youthful Issues: The issues and challenges that are relevant and important to young people, such as education, employment, health, and the environment.

Youth Activism: The use of protest, civil disobedience, and other non-violent action by young people to advocate for their rights and interests.

Youthful Campaigning: The use of innovative and engaging tactics by candidates and parties to reach out to young voters and mobilize their support.

Youthful Engagement: The process of fostering dialogue and collaboration between young people and political leaders to promote the participation and representation of young people in politics.

Zero-Sum Game: A situation in which the gain of one party is equal to the loss of the other party, and any profit or loss by one side has a corresponding increase or failure by the other.

Zero Tolerance: The policy of taking strict and uncompromising measures against a particular behavior or action to eliminate or minimize its occurrence.

Zero-Based Budgeting: A budgeting method that starts from zero and builds up a budget based on the activities and priorities of an organization rather than assuming that the previous year’s budget should be the starting point.

Zero-Sum Politics: A political environment or situation in which the gains and losses of political parties are viewed as a zero-sum game, and any gain by one party is seen as a loss by the other party.

Zero-Sum Electoral Politics: An electoral system or process in which the gains and losses of political parties are viewed as a zero-sum game, and the victory of one party is seen as the defeat of the other party.

Zero-Sum Electoral Strategy: A campaign strategy that focuses on maximizing the gains of one’s party and minimizing the profits of the opposition party to win the election.

Zero-Sum Electoral Tactics: The tactics and strategies used by political parties and candidates in an election to maximize their gains and minimize the profits of the opponent.

Zero-Sum Electoral Competition: The competition between political parties and candidates in an election, in which the goal is to win the most seats or votes, and the victory of one party see as the defeat of the other party.

Zero-Sum Electoral Outcome: The result of an election in which the gains and losses of political parties are viewed as a zero-sum game, and the victory of one party is seen as the defeat of the other party.

Conclusion

If you are an Indian politics enthusiast or want to be in the know of current affairs, then this election glossary is for you.

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Published On: December 16th, 2022 / Categories: Political Marketing /

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